Providing health care to trans people and communities and honouring the Trans day of remembrance Barry Hill barry.hil@northumbria.ac.uk Assistant Professor, Nursing Science. Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Nursing the trans community As a nurse or health support worker, you will provide care for people from diverse backgrounds, and it is important that you help to create a safe and welcoming environment for all your patients and clients. As some trans patients have reported poor experiences of health care settings, your approach has … Read more Providing health care to trans people and communities and honouring the Trans day of remembrance Barry Hill barry.hil@northumbria.ac.uk Assistant Professor, Nursing Science. Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

World AIDS Day Barry Hill barry.hil@northumbria.ac.uk Assistant Professor, Nursing Science. Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

The first cases of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) were reported 41 years ago in 1981. Since then, nurses all over the world have been at the forefront of the fight against the epidemic. They have stepped up to provide skilled care for those infected and affected by the virus. Each year, on 1 December, the … Read more World AIDS Day Barry Hill barry.hil@northumbria.ac.uk Assistant Professor, Nursing Science. Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

A mother’s lifelong support by Jill Edwards

A mother’s lifelong support Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a serious, inherited, long term condition. CF primarily affects the lungs and digestive system but as it progresses other organs are affected. CF related diabetes (a different form of diabetes to type 1 & 2), liver disease, CF related arthritis and osteoporosis are complications of CF. People … Read more A mother’s lifelong support by Jill Edwards

Nephrotic mumma: chronic illness and motherhood by Sophie Clifford

Living with an invisible chronic illness isn’t easy: you end up having rehearsed answers to lots of questions about your health, you know what it’s like to live with permanent fatigue, big worries about the future are just things you think about every day, you are incredibly good at collecting water samples in tiny bottles and you are probably on first name terms with a few of the nurses at your local hospital. Earlier this year I decided to add a baby into this craziness and the last 7 months have been the biggest learning curve of my life.

Don’t get me wrong, I would not change being a mum for the world. It is the best thing to ever happen to me, especially when I wasn’t sure if it was something that was even possible. However, 4:30 wake up calls when you are struggling with the side effects from an infusion isn’t the most helpful way to recover. Mostly, me and Jude; that’s my little boys name to save me calling him baby all the way through this, have adjusted well. We’ve coped with a pretty stressful induction as I wasn’t allowed to go over the 40-week mark due to my nephrotic syndrome. I had a relapse into my condition when he was just three months old and we muddled through meds, changing our feeding and infusions on the day ward.

We may have managed to get through my relapse pretty well, but it brought back something I had a lot in pregnancy; the fear that due to having a chronic illness and everything that goes along with that, I would not be a good mum. The guilt I feel when I’m fatigued and aching from rocking him to sleep is inescapable, the worry that I’m not going to always be my full energetic, up for anything self when he needs me weighs on me heavily and I think about it a lot. Due to having to reintroduce my medications I had to stop pumping milk a lot earlier than I had planned and that was something it took me a long time to be happy with. I was never the sort of person to be like I must breast feed but, it felt like the decision was took out of my hands by my health.

Despite the worries I’ve carried around, because of my own journey with chronic illness, I know that Jude will be raised to be understanding and empathetic of peoples struggles, whether they are visible or invisible. He will know that everyone is different and that should be celebrated. Whenever I worry about my ability as a mum, I just have to look at Jude’s smiling face and know that he is happy, healthy and loved. Whatever comes our way with my health or anything else, my little family will muddle through it together.

Dr Jenny Waite-Jones discusses International Disability Day

Given that one in every ten of the world’s children has a disability (1) the International Disability Day offers the opportunity to reflect on how nursing has been transformed from caring for disabled children within institutional settings to its current aim for family nursing. This includes caring for children within their own homes whenever possible. … Read more Dr Jenny Waite-Jones discusses International Disability Day

Quality time for everyone – Steph Edusei from St Oswald’s Hospice

At St Oswald’s Hospice, our slogan is “Quality time for everyone”, and that truly is what we strive to deliver to everyone who comes into our care, said Steph Edusei, Chief Executive Officer of St Oswald’s Hospice. Time to enjoy family and friends, time to make peace, time to make memories, time to put things … Read more Quality time for everyone – Steph Edusei from St Oswald’s Hospice

Reflections on world breast feeding awareness week 2022

The aim of the World Health Assembly (WHA) is to increase the global rate of exclusive breastfeeding to at least 50% by 2025. In 2018 a World health Assembly resolution endorsed World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) as an important promotion strategy. Each year WBW delivers a campaign to galvanise action related to breastfeeding.   Sadly, I continue … Read more Reflections on world breast feeding awareness week 2022

IFNA International Nurses Day Photo Social Media Campaign

Each year, International Nurses Day on the 12th of May recognises the contributions of nurses worldwide. These year’s theme was Nursing: A Voice to Lead. Sparked by an idea from IFNA President Veronica Swallow, the IFNA Communications Committee sent out a request for members to share photos on Twitter using #NursesDay or #IND2022 and tag @IFNAorg to … Read more IFNA International Nurses Day Photo Social Media Campaign

It’s a matter of social justice – a ‘voice’ to influence policies affecting health

Alison Morton, Executive Director at Institute of Health Visiting Across the globe, nations are focusing their efforts on rebuilding in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and its wider impacts. In England, these impacts have been felt acutely by families with babies and young children. We are incredibly proud of the role that health visitors … Read more It’s a matter of social justice – a ‘voice’ to influence policies affecting health

Working with families to support their child with a learning disability/autism

Dr Angela Ridley, Senior Lecturer at Northumbria University Chloe Hawkins, Student Registered Nurse Learning Disabilities at Northumbria University Join  #lLDWeek2022  @LD_Northumbria  Many people are unaware of the Registered Nurse Learning Disabilities. This piece gives insight into the role, by discussing how students are prepared to support families who have children with learning disabilities/autism. As well … Read more Working with families to support their child with a learning disability/autism